Chef Tobie Puttock’s true colours

After 25 years working in Italian kitchens, Tobie Puttock has consumed more espresso shots than many would dare attempt in a lifetime. 

At just 18 years of age, Tobie would watch as waiters brought a tray of 12 espressos to the kitchen for the staff of four on the hour, and they’d drink every one. 

“It was espresso all the way because that’s what the other chefs had and I wanted to fit in, to the point I’d drink so much I’d be a shaking nervous wreck,” Tobie says. “We were doing six double shifts a week on a seven-month contract, and everyone just lived off caffeine.”

Growing up, Tobie’s parents weren’t big on coffee. His first taste of Nescafe was thanks to his “bogan best mate” at 17, but it is the aroma of coffee he recalls most, brewing in his godmother’s restaurant. It’s still the thing he enjoys waking up to each day. 

“The first thing I do in the morning is put a pod through my Nespresso machine, which is like getting a big warm hug to start the day,” he says. Read more

Adrian Richardson’s rich traditions

There have been many significant people in Adrian Richardson’s life that have offered him advice, passed on skills, and shared recipes. But when it comes to coffee appreciation, Adrian has his grandfathers to thank. 

 “I lived with my grandparents when I was young and there was always a coffee aroma in the house. I remember my grandfather grinding the coffee with an electric grinder and putting it into a little cafeteria – that was nonno’s coffee,” Adrian says. “I would sit on his knee, put two sugars in his coffee and stir it around.” Read more

Everybody loves Reymond

At age 11, Jacques Reymond was exposed to coffee, but not in the way many Australians know it. Rather than fond memories of drinking instant dried granules, bialetti coffee boiling on the stovetop, or a golden espresso dripping from a spout, Jacques recalls his first exposure to caffeine in the form of a liqueur.  Read more

Peter Gilmore’s food opera

Peter Gilmore works in what is arguably one the best office settings in Australia, if not the world – the Sydney Opera House. Each day he looks out over Sydney Harbour at Bennelong restaurant with a “strong” piccolo latte in hand, and marvels at how lucky he is. Read more

Curtis’ stepping stones

Curtis Stone has made his first Los Angeles-based restaurant Maude a success by celebrating just one ingredient each month. Such foods have included zucchinis, plums, cherries, radishes, and apples, to name a few. When BeanScene asks Curtis if coffee has ever made the cut, there’s a slight pause in his response. Read more

BeanScene goes inside Heston Blumenthal’s world

One of the world’s most celebrated chefs, Heston Blumenthal, has returned to Melbourne to launch his new TV series Inside Heston’s World.

On 7 March BeanScene attended the premier launch at the now-Dinner by Heston Blumenthal restaurant at Crown Casino. Read more