texture milk perfect pour

How to texture milk and perform the perfect pour

Mocopan Coffee’s Babin Gurung on how to effectively train a new barista to texture milk and build confidence in their ability to perform a perfect pour.

As confident as you are in your barista role, teaching someone new the basics of coffee making can be a challenge. Something like milk texturing may come second nature to you, but for a beginner, it might sound like rocket science. That’s why knowing something and teaching it are two very different skill sets. An experienced barista needs to have both. Read more

penguin latte art jibbi little

Penguin latte art by Jibbi Little

Jibbi Little shares a challenging penguin latte art design with a lot of character and two happy feet.

From the whimsical movie Happy Feet showing one penguin’s desire to dance, to Morgan Freeman’s majestic voice narrating the sometimes harsh March of the Penguins, the flightless birds have captivated people’s imaginations with their unique look, behaviour, and habitats.

Jibbi Little
Jibbi Little of Jibbijug is the 2019 ASCA Pauls Professional Australian Latte Art Champion.

Though both these films follow the huge emperor penguins of Antarctica, Australia has a native species of its own, the fairy or little penguins. Victoria’s Phillip Island is best known for its little penguin population, as is Western Australia’s Penguin Island, home to 1000 pairs of penguins during winter that featured in a movie of its own, Oddball, in 2015.

The penguin is a popular latte art design, but for my version, I’m going to get the scene and add a little extra detail. This pattern is complex and may prove difficult for beginners. It requires a good understanding of spacing to ensure the penguin looks right when the body connects with the wings. 

You’ll also need to understand how one technique will affect the look of another, such as pouring through the hearts in step one to draw the branch. 

A high level of proficiency is also needed to master the different sized and shaped rosettas, thickening your pour when moving from the body to the face, and the cunning eye technique used to provide the design with its character.

Getting the right shape for the face, eye, and beak will also likely take quite a bit of work to perfect.

This fairy penguin design is definitely a challenge, but the reward is the look on your customers’ faces when you reward them with a delicious coffee and equally impressive-looking latte art of a feathered, fluffy friend.

This article appears in the December 2019 edition of BeanScene Magazine. Subscribe HERE.

 

Jibbi Little’s Little Penguin

penguin latte art jibbi little

Step 1

With the handle at 12 o’clock, pour four small hearts from six to three o’clock, pulling through on the last heart to form a branch.

penguin latte art jibbi little

Step 2

Pour a nine-leaf rosetta from where this branch ends to roughly nine o’clock, then pull through.

penguin latte art jibbi little

Step 3

Turn the handle to three o’clock. Pour a five-leaf rosetta from the centre of the cup to the handle, then pull back through along the side, forming the first wing.

penguin latte art jibbi little

Step 4

Near the bottom heart of the first branch, pour a horizontal seven-leaf rosetta to the edge of the cup, forming the ground.

penguin latte art jibbi little

Step 5

Just to the left of the centre of the cup, pour a five-leaf rosetta, ending just before touching the ground. Then, pull back up along the side, forming a second wing.

penguin latte art jibbi little

Step 6

To create the body, start with a small heart just above the ground, pointing inwards. Pour a backwards question mark shape beginning from the bottom that connects both wings and ends with the loop above them.

penguin latte art jibbi little

Step 7

In the same motion but with a thicker foam, use the cunning eye technique to fill in the face and draw the eye. Pull through along the bottom to form a beak.

penguin latte art jibbi little

Step 8

Drop a small amount of foam below the second wing to form the tail, another larger drop to fill the body, and a small drop at one o’clock to form the moon.

coffee machine boiler

Coffee machine boiler 101

Maurizio Marcocci of Service Sphere compares single, twin, and multi boiler systems and explains why one is sometimes better than two.

An espresso machine is a complex piece of equipment, which only becomes more so as manufacturers add new features and technologies to improve coffee quality. Read more

coffee roast

Inside a coffee roast

Dr. Monika Fekete explores the evolution of a coffee bean under an electron microscope and uncovers how roast levels affect grinding.

Watching green beans turn into aromatic roasted coffee is something of a magical experience.  Read more

opening a café

The dos and don’ts of opening a café

Mocopan Coffee’s Kyle Rutten on opening a café, and why it’s more important than ever to understand your market and stand out from the crowd.

The modern café market is a very dynamic one. While there are many simple yet successful cafés operating today, it’s not as easy as it once was to get people through the door. Once upon a time a simple window sign that read “coffee” with a large lurking coffee machine in the background was all you needed to attract a crowd. Today it’s about more than just the caffeine kick. Customers want the story, the flavour, and the trust that the person making their coffee is excellent at it, and a great environment to experience it in. We want it all.  Read more

bitterness in coffee

Bitter sweet symphony: What causes bitterness in coffee and how to avoid it

Mocopan Coffee’s Babin Gurung on what causes bitterness in coffee and how to avoid it.

As a barista, one of the most common complaints you get from customers is that their coffee tastes bitter or burnt. As happy as you are to remake the coffee, you need to know what’s causing the problem, otherwise you’ll be serving the same bad-tasting coffee.  Read more

Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood latte art by Jibbi Little

What great latte art you have. All the better to drink you with.
Jibbi Little presents her take on a classic fable.

The story of Little Red Riding Hood always stuck with me as a child.

Jibbi Little
Jibbi Little of Jibbijug is the 2019 ASCA Pauls Professional Australian Latte Art Champion.

Most people know the basics: a young girl goes to visit her grandmother, takes a shortcut through the woods, and encounters the Big Bad Wolf. She tells the hungry canine where she’s going, who beats her there and impersonates her grandmother. In most versions of the story, the wolf then eats Little Red Riding Hood.

The moral for children is to not talk to strangers, though I see a second lesson hidden in the beginning. Whether on a trip to a relative or learning a skill like latte art, shortcuts are rarely the best way to go about things and often don’t pay off in the long run.

Hard work does, however, and it took me to the World Latte Art Championship earlier this year. But that didn’t happen overnight. It was a long journey and Little Red Riding Hood reminded me why not to take the easy route.

Inspired by this classic fable, I presented this design at the 2019 Central Region Latte Art Championship, and it provided the base for the Mary Poppins pattern I took to the national and world championships.

Though the pattern looks complex, it’s actually made using several simple techniques. The true difficulty in this design lies in achieving the correct size and spacing to land that visual appeal. 

If the rosettas making the hair are uneven, or the long drag forming the hood is too thin, the pattern simply won’t look right. Because these are easy mistakes to make, it can also be tough to repeat the design time after time.

The easiest way to master this pattern – like many things in life – is to practice, stay on the correct path, and don’t mistake a wolf for your grandmother.

This article appears in the October 2019 edition of BeanScene Magazine. Subscribe HERE.

 

Jibbi Little’s Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood

Step 1

Build your base with the handle at two o’clock.

Little Red Riding Hood

Step 2

At eight o’clock, drag two small loops to form a hollow heart pointing towards the centre of the cup.

Little Red Riding Hood

Step 3

Pour an eight-leaf rosetta from the centre of the cup to the bottom and pull through.

Little Red Riding Hood

Step 4

Pour a second rosetta from the centre of the cup to 10 o’clock.

Little Red Riding Hood

Step 5

From here, drag a line across the top of the cup curving in around two o’clock and ending with a small spiral. This should resemble a question mark.

Little Red Riding Hood

Step 6

Pour a figure eight shape in the space between this last line and the rosetta.

Little Red Riding Hood

Step 7

On other side of rosetta, from the point you started the question mark, drag a short line ending with a curve at nine o’clock, then another from here to the point of the heart.

Little Red Riding Hood

Step 8

Finish with a small drop for the eye.

DIY

To DIY or not to DIY

After seeing too many backyard repairs performed incorrectly or dangerously, Maurizio Marcocci of Service Sphere stresses when do-it-yourself maintenance is acceptable and when it’s not. 

With the rise in popularity of commercial and home coffee machines, the team at Service Sphere has seen an immense spike in backyarders attempting repairs and end users having a go themselves.  Read more

temperature coffee machine performance

How temperature effects coffee machine performance

Dr Monika Fekete looks at temperature-dependent variables and their consequences on grinder and espresso machine performance.

On a chilly winter morning, hot cup of coffee in hand, I’m once again thinking about the many ways temperature has influenced the liquid I’m drinking. Read more

strong coffee

What makes a coffee strong?

Mocopan Coffee’s Babin Gurung on what coffee strength means and how to achieve it. 

During my barista hustling days, customers often told me they liked their coffee strong. I had no problem adjusting to customers’ needs, but found many people had different ideas of what “strong” meant. Some of the things strength commonly referred to was more caffeine, darker roast, or sometimes, just bitter coffee. These ideas aren’t necessarily wrong, but here in the coffee world, when we say “strong”, we mean the strength of flavours contained in an espresso.  Read more

© All Rights Reserved. BeanScene is a registered trademark of Prime Creative Media.