Guy Grossi

Guy Grossi: The people’s chef

Australia’s godfather of Italian cuisine, Guy Grossi, speaks to BeanScene about Melbourne’s early coffee culture, family traditions, and why reinventing the wheel is the key to longevity in the hospitality industry. In the 1950s, Lygon Street, or “Little Italy” as it’s known in Melbourne, was a bustling street of Italian migrants hanging outside coffee bars, reading the newspaper, and smoking cigars. On a Sunday, Guy Grossi’s father, Pietro Grossi, a Milanese migrant, would take his son to Lygon’s Caffe Sports bar and converse with everyone he passed. 
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Scott Pickett

Scott Pickett sets the bar

Chef Scott Pickett talks to BeanScene about using coffee as a vehicle for flavour, respecting origin, and the reality of being a business owner in Melbourne’s competitive restaurant scene.  Ten years ago, 12 coffees a day was a regular scenario for Scott Pickett. That was until a Chinese doctor took one look at his eyes and knew instantly his caffeine intake was through the roof. 
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Silvia Colloca

Silvia Colloca shines

Silvia Colloca is a home cook with an unconditional love for baking. She speaks to BeanScene about keeping traditions alive, unforgettable food memories, and roasting coffee in the kitchen. There are two distinct aromas that make Silvia Colloca’s household the envy of most on a Sunday morning – freshly baked bread and freshly roasted coffee on the kitchen bench. “Those are the days you really want to be at our house. The smell is just incredible. It permeates every single room,” Silvia says. Freshly brewing coffee on a little moka pot has been a beautiful morning ritual ever since Silvia recalls growing up in Milan, Italy.
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alastair mcleod

Alastair McLeod’s Aussie ambitions

Alastair McLeod is an Irishman with an Australian appreciation for quality coffee. He talks to BeanScene about European kitchens, his indigenous roots, and why six coffees a day is an acceptable quota. Alastair McLeod still boasts a strong Irish accent after calling Brisbane home for the past 22 years, but in that time he’s adopted a love for all things quintessentially Australian: Vegemite toast, mangos, and coffee. “I can still see my mummy and daddy in Belfast drinking instant coffee. My dad worked in cafes in Ireland and in restaurants throughout school, but Belfast wasn’t a discerning coffee culture growing up. It was in its formative years. They were serving instant coffee in the cafes,” Alastair says. 
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Matt Golinski

Matt Golinski a man of the land

Matt Golinski has coffee on his mind even before his interview with BeanScene magazine begins. On an early morning call to the Sunshine Coast-local, Matt answers the phone while at his local fruit shop buying milk and coffee. “Can I call you back? I’m just getting the only one-kilogram bag of beans on the shelf,” Matt says.
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Chef Tobie Puttock’s true colours

After 25 years working in Italian kitchens, Tobie Puttock has consumed more espresso shots than many would dare attempt in a lifetime.  At just 18 years of age, Tobie would watch as waiters brought a tray of 12 espressos to the kitchen for the staff of four on the hour, and they’d drink every one.  “It was espresso all the way because that’s what the other chefs had and I wanted to fit in, to the point I’d drink so much I’d be a shaking nervous wreck,” Tobie says. “We were doing six double shifts a week on a seven-month contract, and everyone just lived off caffeine.” Growing up, Tobie’s parents weren’t big on coffee. His first taste of Nescafe was thanks to his “bogan best mate” at 17, but it is the aroma of coffee he recalls most, brewing in his godmother’s restaurant. It’s still the thing he enjoys waking up to each day.  “The first thing I do in the morning is put a pod through my Nespresso machine, which is like getting a big warm hug to start the day,” he says.
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Adrian Richardson’s rich traditions

There have been many significant people in Adrian Richardson’s life that have offered him advice, passed on skills, and shared recipes. But when it comes to coffee appreciation, Adrian has his grandfathers to thank.   “I lived with my grandparents when I was young and there was always a coffee aroma in the house. I remember my grandfather grinding the coffee with an electric grinder and putting it into a little cafeteria – that was nonno’s coffee,” Adrian says. “I would sit on his knee, put two sugars in his coffee and stir it around.”
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